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2024

Volume 1, Issue 1, p1-9

Articles published in this issue are Open Access and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY NC) where the readers can reuse, download, distribute the article in whole or part by mentioning proper credits to the authors.

Unilateral Ptosis Secondary to Pansinusitis in a Pediatric Patient: A Case Report

Ptosis or the dropping of an eyelid can affect both the adult and pediatric populations and can be caused by various factors. Ptosis is not very common and in children, the common causes include orbital cellulitis, congenital ptosis, Cranial Nerve III palsy, and Horner’s syndrome.

Arch Clin Pediatr, 2024, Volume 1, Issue 1, p1-3 | DOI: 10.33696/Pediatrics.1.001

Majocchi Granuloma in the Face of an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report

Introduction: Majocchi granuloma (MG) is a rare infection, generally caused by the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum. This disease results from the proliferation of the fungus along the hair follicle into the dermal or subcutaneous tissue, causing suppurative folliculitis. Most affected patients are immunocompromised, but it is not restricted to them. Its evolution is due to prolonged use of topical steroids.

Arch Clin Pediatr, 2024, Volume 1, Issue 1, p4-9 | DOI: 10.33696/Pediatrics.1.002

Recommended Articles

Unilateral Ptosis Secondary to Pansinusitis in a Pediatric Patient: A Case Report

Ptosis or the dropping of an eyelid can affect both the adult and pediatric populations and can be caused by various factors. Ptosis is not very common and in children, the common causes include orbital cellulitis, congenital ptosis, Cranial Nerve III palsy, and Horner’s syndrome.

Majocchi Granuloma in the Face of an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report

Introduction: Majocchi granuloma (MG) is a rare infection, generally caused by the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum. This disease results from the proliferation of the fungus along the hair follicle into the dermal or subcutaneous tissue, causing suppurative folliculitis. Most affected patients are immunocompromised, but it is not restricted to them. Its evolution is due to prolonged use of topical steroids.